Faculty Profiles

Northwestern University Psychology Department

A big thank you to all the faculty members who participated in our survey!


Galen Bodenhausen
Joan Chiao (updated 6/06)
Alice Eagly (updated 5/06)
Eli Finkel (updated 5/06)
Steven Franconeri (updated 7/06)
Wendi Gardner (updated 5/06)
Dedre Gentner
Marcia Grabowecky
Susan Hespos (updated 5/06)
William S. Horton [Sid] (updated 5/06)
Joan Linsenmeier (updated 5/06)
Dan McAdams
Douglas Medin (updated 5/06)
Ken Paller
Paul Reber
Jennifer Richeson
Lance Rips
J. Peter Rosenfeld (updated 5/06)
I have always thought it would be interesting to be an artist or writer. Or a biologist or physical anthropologist. Astrophysics is also cool. I am quite interested in Buddhism also, so maybe I should have been a monk.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I like teaching students who are interested in the topic. I have been fortunate to work with several really excellent students who have done honors theses with me, or who work in my lab, and I am so impressed with their enthusiasm, curiosity, and generally gung-ho approach to psychology. I don't enjoy dealing with grade-grubbing behaviors, but I do understand it. There is a lot of pressure on students to maximize the GPA.

Finish this sentence: Freud was… a projective test... psychologists who can't admit that Freud had interesting ideas are generally suffering from physics envy and are worried about not looking sufficiently rigorous; but those who buy entirely into Freudianism as a guiding philosophy are much more exasperating. I once heard a Freudian (former) colleague claim that women in his class were less likely than men to return pencils borrowed for an exam, and that this reflected penis envy. That is quite possibly the lamest psychological claim of all time, but he was quite serious about it.

Two things every student needs to know about you:
- I hate it when students beg for extra credit.
- I'm bad at thinking of things that students need to know about me.

Five things that not many people know about you:
- I am an inveterate Simpsons watcher and I base my life philosophy on the show.
- At the moment I am obsessed with Scrabble because of the book Word Freak.
- I own an astounding number of CDs because I love all kinds of music.
- I have lived lots of different places, including several cities in Europe, and Chicago is my favorite place.
- Sad to say, I saw Jackass: The Movie and thought it was actually fairly amusing.  

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Joan Chiao

Hometown/Birthplace: Miami, FL

Educational Background:
B.S. Stanford University, Symbolic Systems (2000)
Ph.D. Harvard University, Psychology (2006)

Date came to NU: June 2006

Classes taught/teaching: Undergraduate: Social and Affective Neuroscience (Fall 2006)

Current research pursuits: Cultural neuroscience

Do you need any help in your lab? Yes, yes, yes! Always excited to meet students and get them involved in research. Also interested in working with students on long-term projects such as a senior honors thesis. For students interested in doing a thesis, it's good to get involved in a lab by the beginning of junior year.

Describe the best work environment for you: Anywhere that's quiet

Why are you here? To Learn

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Astronaut

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? It's a lot of fun to teach students who are hardworking, genuinely curious and willing to take risks.

Two things every student needs to know about you: I love meeting students and working on projects with them. Am willing to think through the craziest of ideas -- and find a way to test it (subject of course to IRB approval)!

Five things that not many people know about you: When not psychologizing, I love to play music, frisbee, travel, cook and learn whatever I can about octopi.
 

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Alice Eagly

Hometown/Birthplace: Born in Los Angeles; lived in LA, Oakland, Long Beach, Seattle.

Educational Background: BA Radcliffe/Harvard; MA & Ph.D. University of Michigan.

Date came to NU: 1995

Classes taught/teaching: Undergraduate: Psych 339 (Psychology of Gender), freshman & advanced seminars; Graduate: Meta-Analysis; Psychology of Attitudes; various seminars.

Current research pursuits: Attitudes of men and women on sociopolitical issues; biosocial model of origins of sex differences; gender & leadership; other gender topics, such as heroism, stereotype threat, perceptions of feminism; prejudice; the content of stereotypes.

Do you need any help in your lab? Yes

Describe the best work environment for you: In my office; in my house in various locations.

Why are you here? Great department, great city, great colleagues. Who could ask for more?

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? I would be an anthropologist, sociologist, or biologist, probably also a professor. Otherwise, a science writer. I would hope to be living in an interesting large city.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? Love to teach those who have a deep intellectual interest in psychology & in learning more generally. I love them even more if they participate in class. Loathe to teach those who are not interested and/or don't come to class or do the readings.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... brilliant but flawed. I have a Freud Action Figure here on my desk.

Five things every student needs to know about you:
- I'm interested in my undergraduate students.
- I think that gender is enormously important in everyone's life & therefore they should study this topic.
- I think that analytic skills and writing skills are critical to a good university education, so in my courses students are expected to exercise, develop, & demonstrate these skills.
- I think that social psychology is fun & intellectually challenging.
- I think that Northwestern students are, in general, impressively intelligent.

Five things that not many people know about you:
- I have two children, a husband, a grandchild, and one brother.
- I don't like to watch cartoons or engage in conversation about the Simpsons.
- I left Purdue University to come here because of those calls asking me if I wanted to buy a cemetery plot for myself in Lafayette.
- Now I am getting mail from the Hemlock Society.
- I hope to live long enough to write several more books.
 

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Eli Finkel

Hometown/Birthplace: Wilmette, IL

Educational Background: BA from NU, 1997; MA from UNC-Chapel Hill, 1999; PhD from UNC-Chapel Hill, 2001

Date came to NU: July, 2003

Classes taught/teaching: Psych 110, Psych 204, Psych 384 (Close Relationships)

Current research pursuits: Close Relationships

Do you need any help in your lab: Always, but we've been pretty full lately

Describe the best work environment for you: Coffee shop

Why are you here? It's my dream job  

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Steven Franconeri

Hometown/Birthplace: West Caldwell, NJ

Educational Background: Ph.D. from Harvard University, B.A from Rutgers University

Date came to NU: Fall 2006

Classes taught/teaching: Undergraduate: Fall 2006: Psych 358, Vision - From attention to aesthetics.

This seminar will survey research in high-level visual perception, through readings and group discussion of both classic and cutting-edge research papers. Why do individual birds seem to be absorbed by the flock? Why is it so hard to find Waldo? Why can movie editors make mistakes, but we don’t notice? What is attractive about a painting’s composition, or a person’s face or walk? Course topics include visual attention, perceptual organization, scene perception & visual memory, social perception of faces, bodies, & emotions, cues to agency and causality, and aesthetic appreciation of visual art & composition.

For advanced undergraduates, it may be possible to take my graduate class (Psych 460: Special Topics in Cognition: Visual Attention & Cognition) that covers research on how we select, remember, count, compare, and track objects in the visual world.

Current research pursuits: The world presents our visual system with an overwhelmingly rich image. We cannot fully process everything at once, and instead must focus our attention on the most relevant information. My research focuses on the tools that we use to select visual information, and how these tools are applied. Can we select more than one thing at a time? How do we compare the features of two objects, or judge their spatial relations? How much of attention is automatic, and how much is under our control? How do we prioritize visual information over time, when viewing a scene, face, or painting?

This research extends to processes that support and interact with visual selection. These processes include visual memory, which helps us store what we have selected in the past, object tracking, which helps us maintain selection of moving objects, and number perception, which relies on selection mechanisms to construct the units behind the counting process. I use ERP to see how these processes unfold over time at a microscopic level, such as judging spatial relations, and eyetracking to see how we prioritize visual information at a macroscopic level (e.g., eye movements while viewing scenes, faces, and art). At the broadest level, I am also interested in how the visual system interacts with other fundamental systems, such as language, emotion, and social perception

Do you need any help in your lab? Yes!! No experience necessary. Please stop by the lab or my office to hear about what we're up to.

Describe the best work environment for you: Surrounded by curious people. And coffee.

Why are you here? Perception research is at the intersection of graphic design, computer vision, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience.... You get to play in several areas, which is great for people with broad interests.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Doing research in economics or computer science. Or perhaps making educational software or computer music interfaces.

Two things every student needs to know about you:
- My lab is empty without energetic undergrads
- I started working in a perception lab early in college, and loved it.

Five things that not many people know about you:
- I like squash. A lot. The sport, not the veggie. Although there's nothing wrong with the veggie.
- I am married to Professor Chiao, and we like to cook, travel, and do nerdy social perception projects together.
- I am a coffee and beer aficionado.
- As a young lad, I was an origami champ.
- During college I spent a fantastic summer in Japan creating hyper-intelligent robokittens that were designed to take over the world. Seriously. Be afraid.
 

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Wendi Gardner

Hometown/Birthplace: born in Washington D.C. but moved to sunny south Florida at 18 months and stayed until graduate school

Educational Background: Florida Atlantic University for undergrad (BA); The Ohio State University (Go Buckeyes!) for grad school

Date came to NU: 1996

Classes taught/teaching: Introduction to Psychology, Social Psychology, and upper level courses on The Self and also on Emotion

Current research pursuits: I examine the way culture and gender influence self-construal, and the implications of different ways of viewing the self (e.g., in a more individual or social fashion) has on social cognition and behavior. I also am very interested in understanding "belonging regulation" -or in other words, the psychological processes that allow us to continually monitor and maintain our levels of social acceptance, and the ways in which our unconscious cognition and automatic behaviors enable us to be more socially skilled and likeable after a rejection experience.

Do you need any help in your lab: Yes, we almost always have projects that could use curious and motivated young psychologists!

Describe the best work environment for you: Friendly and relaxed. A goofy truth is that every office I have ever had (including my home office) has always needed to be bright yellow - so when i recently moved offices here I snuck in one weekend with some other rebellious faculty and painted the walls of my office yellow (quite illegally, shhhh. . .don't tell). I am also happiest on the days when my sweet wrinkly-faced pug dog, Lily, comes to the office with me -she usually joins me at the office every Friday.

Why are you here? In an existentialist sense or a professional sense? In a professional sense (the other question is too deep for me to answer without a beer), I am here because I love my colleagues at Northwestern, and i love how bright and motivated the students are. Its great fun to teach here.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Well, in my dreamlife i might be the "Food and Wine traveler" paid to travel to exotic places and eat in great restaurants and write about it in magazines. But more realistically, if I wasn't a psych prof I would probably be involved with animal welfare in some way -perhaps working at a non-profit organization, or in an animal shelter, or in an animal behavior/training program.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love to teach students who are intrinsically curious about human nature. I hate to teach folks who are only in it for a grade.

Finish this sentence: Two things every student needs to know about you:
(1) Students will often look at me, somewhat shellshocked, after the first exam in my class and say "but you seem so nice. . " Yup - I am nice, I also have high expectations.
(2) The other thing folks should know is that I have the cutest dog in the world -and yes, complimenting her clear and obvious loveability when you meet her is a good way to impress me- because it shows your inherent good taste and fine character.

Five things that not many people know about you:
(1) Krispy Kreme donuts are, in my opinion, a food group unto themselves and rivaled only by marshmallow Peeps in terms of foods that I know are really really bad for me, but that i cannot ever resist. Viva la Peeps! they are not only delicious, but also great fodder for science experiments -go here for proof http://www.peepresearch.org/
(2) I'm half Chinese - my Mom is from Shanghai, but folks don't know I'm Asian American because I have my Dad's all-American last name
(3) I'm a huge sucker for 'self-improvement' magazines - and sometimes get into "Martha Stewart moments" when i decide that i must paint, polish, puree, or otherwise do something else preposterously domestic. It scares my husband, but he's learned to get out of my way -and to compliment me afterwards "honey, that new squash blossom soup was so. . .interesting"
(4) I hate my hair. Always have. . .always will. And I feel great hostility for the Pantene "don't hate me because I am beautiful" shampoo model. *Great* hostility. As in, "I would run her down with my car if I saw her on the street" hostility.
(5) I once was a Druid. No seriously, when I was a child, my family was (for a very brief time) Druids and went to a church that worshipped trees and the spirits of nature. If you're guessing i was raised by "new age" parents -yes indeedy you are correct. The freaky thing is that my Mom was 'new age' before there *was* a new age. She is now a Feng-Shui consultant - and trust me, the energy in my house is soooooo well-balanced.  

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Dedre Gentner

Hometown/Birthplace: Reno, Nevada

Educational Background: PhD UCSD

Date came to NU: 1990

Classes taught/teaching: Cognitive Science 211, Language and thought, Representation of knowledge [grad course].

Current research pursuits: language and thought, learning and reasoning; analogy and metaphor, acquisition of word meaning.

Do you need any help in your lab? There is room for one or two more students who are interested in topics like analogical learning and reasoning; metaphor and thought; and/or the development of children's thought and language. Someone knowledgeable about online databases and corpora would fit in well with some of our current projects.

Describe the best work environment for you: Research lab with smart people who are wiling to push hard to get answers

Why are you here? To learn

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Studying intelligent creatures -- crows or bonobos perhaps -- in the wild. Or maybe trying to save species from extinction.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love to teach those who are bright, energetic and genuinely curious. I loathe to teach those who are bored and cynical.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... a pioneer in the exploration of the unconscious.  

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Marcia Grabowecky

Hometown/Birthplace: Calgary, Alberta / Winnipeg, Manitoba

Educational Background: BA Psychology, University of Calgary; MA Cognitive Psychology, University of British Columbia; Ph.D. Cognitive Psychology, University of California, Berkeley; Post-doc Center for Neuroscience, University of California, Davis

Date came to NU: July, 1994

Classes Taught/Teaching: Intro Psych, Cognitive Psych, Perception, Visual Attention, Buddhist Psychology

Current research pursuits: Professor Suzuki and I are trying to understand how attention and adaptation interact with the processes that represent visual objects. I am also interested in spatial cognition.

Do you need any help in your lab? Often

Describe the best work environment for you: Collaborative, where at least a small number of people are working on the same questions so that ideas can spark against each other.

Why are you here? Why not?

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Right now, probably trying to work as a ceramic artist.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? Interested / Disinterested

Finish this sentence: Freud was... largely irrelevant to the kind of psychology I'm interested in.

Five things that come to mind that every student needs to know about you:
- Plan to come to class; if you don't come to class, find out what happened there
- Use office hours to do better in class
- Expect change from the syllabus
- My classes assume that the brain and body underlie all psychological processes.
- Join our lab if you are interested in working in attention and visual perception.

Three things that come to mind that not many people know about you:
- I have a long-standing interest in Buddhism as both a religion and a theory of mind
- I enjoy ceramics, especially hand-building
- I like to read just about everything
 

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Susan Hespos

Hometown/Birthplace: New York, New York

Educational Background: BA from Reed College in Portland, OR; PhD. from Emory University, Atlanta GA; Postdocs at UIUC, Champaign, IL; and MIT, Cambridge, MA

Date came to NU: 2005

Classes taught/teaching: Developmental Psych and Research Methods

Current research pursuits: Cognitive development: I am interested in the origins of concepts about space, objects, and number. I do behavioral testing on infants less than one year of age. I also do research in neuroscience looking at blood flow changes in babies brains using optical imaging.

Do you need any help in your lab: Yep.

Describe the best work environment for you: This one. It is intellectually challenging, supportive, and lots of fun.

Why are you here? Because I can be! The lake, the city, the colleagues, and students make it a great place to be.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? The idea of being an architect appeals to me but I would also be happy in any job that allows me to explore and travel.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love students that are motivated to think and loathe ones that whine.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... an interesting historical figure but I think many of his ideas were wrong.

Two things every student needs to know about you: I work hard and I expect my students to work hard too. I am allergic to whining.

Five things that not many people know about you: I love to ride my bike to school. It is impossible for me to speak slowly. I am a terrible cook but I love to eat good food. I think every student should study abroad at some point in life.  

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William S. Horton [Sid]

Hometown/Birthplace: Fayetteville, AR

Educational Background: B.S. Duke University; M.A. & Ph.D. University of Chicago

Date came to NU: Fall 2005

Classes taught/teaching: Cognitive Psych (Psy228), Research Methods (Psy205)

Current research pursuits: psychology of discourse and conversation; age-related differences in language production

Do you need any help in your lab: Yes, always!

Describe the best work environment for you: I work best in my office, away from distractions.

Why are you here? Because NU is a great institution with amazing resources that support the education and research of very bright people! And Chicago doesn't hurt either.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? I would be an architect, hopefully practicing in Chicago!

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love to teach students who talk back (in the good way!) and who don't mind my attempts to be funny. I loathe to teach students who disrespect me and fail to appreciate the fact that I work very hard to prepare for class.

Two things every student needs to know about you: I respond very well when I am approached in advance about special problems or situations. I respond very poorly when students expect special treatment after the fact.

Five things that not many people know about you:
- I am a tremendous fan of college sports.
- I've met Bill and Hillary Clinton (when he was governor of AR).
- I chipped out my own pieces of the Berlin Wall.
- I recently discovered the joys of Tivo.
- I want to putter in my own garden.
 

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Joan Linsenmeier

Hometown/Birthplace: Pittsburgh, PA

Educational Background: BS - Mathematics and Psychology - Carnegie Mellon University; MA and PhD - Psychology - Northwestern University

Date came to NU: I came to NU as a graduate student in 1973, earned my PhD in 1977, and stayed as a post doc till 1979. Then came our west coast experience; see below. I returned to NU as the wife of a faculty member in 1983. I've been involved in teaching and/or administration at NU since the 1987-1988 academic year. (I'm also an NU mom; all three of my children have NU degrees.)

Classes taught/teaching: I've taught Freshman Seminars, Statistics, Research Methods, Social Psych, Experimental Social Psych, and Developmental Psych. Once upon a time, I co-taught a Special Topics course on Psych of Gender with Prof. Bailey. I currently work primarily as the Director of Curricular Projects in WCAS and do advising and administrative work in psychology, so I'm not teaching any courses this year.

Describe the best work environment for you: I know from my brief stint in the business world that I don't like being stuck in my own little cubicle. I like having a job where, on most days, I work in more than one building and have a good excuse for taking a walk in the middle of the day! I like having colleagues with whom I enjoy interacting, and I like it when my work makes me think and when I have a chance to learn new things.

Why are you here? I came as a grad student because the social psych program sounded good on paper, because one of my undergrad profs said I'd like the people, and because my boyfriend (now my husband) was a grad student here. I came as a faculty wife because my husband (formerly my boyfriend) got a job here. I came as a faculty member because I was ready to go back to work, because I like hanging around on college campuses, and because Prof. Revelle, department chair at the time, invited me to teach some courses.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Maybe in a different type of school setting. When I started college, I expected to become a high school math teacher. Maybe working in some other sort of non-profit setting, rather than in a school. Probably doing something where I can feel that I'm making a positive difference in the lives of children, teens, and/or young adults.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach?In the 1970s, I held stereotypes about various types of students. For example, I thought I wouldn't like working with students in sororities, and I felt sure I wouldn't like students who were in ROTC. I quickly learned that there were students in both groups whom I really liked having in my classes. I don't think there's any "type" of student that I don't like to teach. Which students do I enjoy most? In general, it's the ones who are part of my life for more than one quarter. I enjoy watching students learn and grow throughout their college years. (Of course, there are some confounding variables here. Students who are part of my life for more than one quarter probably share some other characteristics too. Maybe it's something else that makes me enjoy them. This might make a good Research Methods exam question someday!)  

Three things that not many people know about you:
Actually, lots of people do know these things, but probably not many NU students do.
(1) During my west coast years (see above) I worked with Phil Zimbardo, in the building where his Stanford Prison Experiment was carried out.
(2) For many years, I worked part-time at NU and devoted lots of time to volunteer activities, including co-chairing the Evanston HIV Education Task Force, helping to plan the School-Based Health Center at the high school, and serving on various city-wide Gifted Education Committees. One year I ran three after-school activities at our local elementary school.
(3) A friend and I planned out much of our "grown up" lives when we were in junior high. I still have the nicely organized outlines listing my future kids' names, birthdates, favorite foods, clothing, school subjects, etc. I think the match between what I planned and what happened is amazingly good. One of my favorites: I waffled back and forth over whether I wanted to marry an engineer (like my father) or a college professor (like the fathers of some friends). Pretty cool that I ended up with an engineering professor!
 

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Dan McAdams

Hometown/Birthplace: I was born in Lynwood, CA; but I grew up in Gary, IN

Educational Background: : B. S. from Valparaiso University, majoring in Psychology and Humanities (1976); Ph.D. from Harvard University in Psychology and Social Relations (Personality and Developmental Psychology) (1979).

Date came to NU: 1989 for SESP; I moved half of my appointment into Psychology/WCAS in 1997.

Classes taught/teaching: Psychology 215 (Introduction to Personality Psychology); Psychology 357 (Special Topics: The Psychology of Life Stories); Psychology 494 (Personality Psychology Seminar). In SESP, I teach HDSP 404 (Adult Development and Aging) and HDSP 413 (Theories of Human Development), as well as others.

Current research pursuits: research on adult personality development, with an emphasis on generativity, life stories, and culture. Also studies of American politics and the self, which feature in my new book: George W. Bush and the Redemptive Dream: A Psychological Portrait (Oxford University Press, fall of 2010).

Do you need any help in your lab? Typically, yes - especially students interested in personality psychology and in content-analytic methods for interpreting narrative texts (e.g., life story interviews).

Describe the best work environment for you: My current work environment.

Why are you here? I am at Northwestern because this is where I have a fabulous job, Chicago is a great city, and my wife is a federal judge with life tenure here in Chicago. So this is where I am likely to be for quite some time.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be?Maybe on the streets? How can anybody ever know? Maybe teaching English literature. Maybe a lawyer. I might like politics, but the problem is getting elected.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I like to teach, period. I like all students who want to learn, even if that is a clichť. Loathe to teach? A good teacher shouldn't loathe to teach anybody.

Out of all the well-known people in the history of Psychology, who was the most influential for you and why? Erik Erikson. Henry Murray. Charles Darwin. Jerome Bruner.

Three things every student needs to know about you:
I am not sure they need to know anything in particular. I am pretty intense, I guess. I like students who like to read. I love literature, fiction. If a student tells me that he or she does not read books for enjoyment, then I am probably not going to get along real well with that student, though having said that, I think I get along well with most students at NU.

Five things that not many people know about you:
- I am committed to science, but I find many scientists to be anti-intellectual; I guess I see myself as trying to be both a scientist and an intellectual
- I have been a die-hard Chicago Cubs fan since 1962
- I am very ambivalent about religion -- fascinated with it but also sometimes repelled
- I think NU students are too serious; they need to have more fun and to relax
- I am not a very interesting person, in my opinion.
 

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Douglas Medin

Current research pursuits: Native American Science learning, Culture and decision making, Morally-motivated decision making

Do you need any help in your lab: yup.

Describe the best work environment for you: outdoors

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? An Anthropology Professor at Montana State University

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I coach, I don't teach. Love those who want to play.

 

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Ken Paller

Hometown/Birthplace: L.A.

Educational Background: BS in Psychobiology from UCLA; PhD in Neurosciences from UCSD

Date came to NU: 1994

Classes taught/teaching: Psych 361: Brain Damage and the Mind, Psych 368: Human Memory,Psych 470: Mind/Brain.

Current research pursuits: Human memory and perception, neural foundations of mental functions, cognitive neuroscience - for more information on our research see our lab website: http://pallerlab.psych.northwestern.edu

Do you need any help in your lab? Undergrad students have worked in my lab for C99s, honors, projects, and work-study appointments. Occasionally there are openings for new people. Good preparation includes familiarizing yourself with our recent work by reading papers from our group such as those posted on our lab website.

Why are you here? There are many exciting questions to ask and problems to solve in cognitive neuroscience, and I am happy to be able to work at Northwestern on these issues. I have been driven to this field of study by a desire to try to understand how the mushy stuff inside our skulls provides humans with so many amazing intellectual, artistic, and creative abilities, including conscious experience, and such potential for making the world a better place. For other info, click here.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... responsible for important advances in our understanding of unconscious thought and its relationship to human behavior and conscious experience. His influence on our understanding of the mind should not be underestimated. However, psychodynamic theoretical conjectures that are not testable may not be very useful now. Yet, some hypotheses about the unconscious (or about cognitive processes not always accessible to awareness) can now be analyzed scientifically.  

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Paul Reber

Birthplace: Vancouver, BC Canada (US Citizen)

Date came to NU: Fall 1998

Class Teaching: 205, 363, 470 (graduate seminar)

Research pursuits: Cognitive neuroscience of memory, the neural substrates and operation of memory throughout the brain. See the lab website for more.

Do you need help in your lab? I'm always willing to discuss 399/397 projects with students. I typically expect that an interested student would take 399 first and assist on ongoing projects in the lab. If they are interested after this, we discuss developing their own projects (for 397 or 398). A number of students have gotten summer funding to work in the lab on extended independent study projects. However, we don't take 399 students every quarter, it depends on the status of ongoing lab projects that could use an extra research assistant.

Describe the best work environment for you: The best work environment is one that is intellectually rich in which theoretical ideas are frequently being proposed and scrutinized.

Why are you here? I'm here to advance the general understanding of the organization of memory in the brain and communicate this information through teaching, student supervision and discussion to the NU community. If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Am I allowed to say I'd be a professor in another field like Neuroscience or Computer Science? Outside academia, I'd probably be working in artificial intelligence or other forms of information technology.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I enjoy teaching students who want to learn and who aren't afraid to work hard. I am frustrated by students with a sense of entitlement -- typically these are students who are smart but don't want to put in the effort and are entirely focused on getting a grade over learning the class material.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... an important figure in the history of psychology.

Two things students should know about you:
- If you are taking a class with me: I simply want you to learn what I'm teaching. I like what I teach and if you are getting the ideas, we're both going to be happy.
- If you are considering independent study: Research is challenging and takes a serious commitment, but it's very rewarding when it works out. I'm happy to have undergraduates doing research on the cutting edge -- the workload is high, but we've published this type of work in the top journals.
 

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Jennifer Richeson

Hometown/Birthplace: Baltimore, MD

Educational Background: Sc.B, Brown University; MA &PhD, Harvard University

Date came to NU: 2005

Classes taught/teaching: Research Methods (205), Stereotyping and Prejudice (386); Social Stigma (489)

Current research pursuits:intergroup relations (broadly defined), see my lab web page for more info: http://groups.psych.northwestern.edu/spcl/

Do you need any help in your lab? Almost always.

Describe the best work environment for you: Relaxed, yet intelectually engaged.

Why are you here? Because it is a great place to teach in a wonderful place to live!

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? If I could sing I'd be in NY on Broadway or something like that. Actually, sadly, I'd be an over-the-hill Broadway singer/dancer!

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? Students who are curious about the human condition and loathe? Is there such a student here at NU?

Out of all the well-known people in the history of Psychology, who was the most influential for you and why? Oh, this is way too hard. There are far too many! For the sake of simplicity, I'll go with Kenneth & Mamie Clark. They conducted groundbreaking research on the psychological effects of racism that contributed to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court Case that outlawed legal racial segregation in the US! It just goes to show what an impact basic psychological research can have in society.

Two things every student needs to know about you:
- I'm a firm (read: strict, principled) professor, but also very fair. (that's two, right?) :

Three things that not many people know about you:
- I really wish I could sing!
- I love to play scrabble!
- Steamed blue crabs (and crab cakes) are two of my favorite foods! [I did mention that I'm from Maryland, right?].
 

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Lance Rips

Hometown/Birthplace: Omaha, NE

Educational Background: Swarthmore College, BA; Stanford Univ., PhD

Date came to NU: 1993

Classes taught/teaching: Thinking; Human Memory and Cognition; Reasoning and Representation

Current research pursuits: Reasoning, Concepts, Autobiographical Memory

Do you need any help in your lab? Sometimes.

Describe the best work environment for you: library study

What type of student do you love to teach? Students who are interested in developing new ideas.  

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J. Peter Rosenfeld

Hometown/Birthplace: NYC

Educational Background: BA Columbia MA (English) Columbia, PhD (UIowa)

Date came to NU: 9/15/70

Classes taught/teaching: 312-1,2, 321, 470 323

Current research pursuits: Mechanisms and Detection of Deception, False Memory; Neural correlates of Emotion.

Do you need any help in your lab? Always.

Describe the best work environment for you: Happy, but serious.

Why are you here? I choose to be.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? A writer in Chile, my wife's country.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love to teach an honest, normal one. I loathe to teach a neurotic liar.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... a genius with great courage and insight.

Five things every student needs to know about you:
- I'm kind.
- I'm funny, though serious.
- I am honest.
- I know a lot.
- I need to know more.

Five things that not many people know about you:
- I am an opera fanatic.
- I'm older than I look.
- I think younger than I am.
- I love sports.
- I am very well read.
 

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H. David Smith

Hometown/Birthplace: I was born in Columbus, OH, but mainly raised in Indianapolis.

Educational Background: Ph.D: VCU, MA: Hollins University, B.A. Denison, University

Date came to NU: 2001

Classes taught/teaching: Statistics, Research Methods, Psych and Music, Decision Making, Advanced Statistics, Cognitive Psychology, Statistics in Experimental Design

Current research pursuits: : I am broadly interested in judgment and decision making. I also do a bit of consulting in assessment and evaluation.

Do you need any help in your lab? Not right now.

Describe the best work environment for you: I need autonomy and flexibility. That's one of the things that's great about my job!

Why are you here? My wife and I moved here in 2001 when we both got positions at NU.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? I would hope that I would be working with music in some way. I have also always wanted to be a chef!

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love to teach students who are willing to work hard to master challenging material. Loathe? Entitled Students.

Out of all the well-known people in the history of Psychology, who was the most influential for you and why? ? Two people: Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman. Their collaborative efforts really inspired me to study judgment and decision making.

Five things every student needs to know about you:
- I'm willing to help any student.
- I am a huge music fan and play guitar.>

Five things that not many people know about you:
- I went to college with Steve Carrell.
- I am proficient at pizza tossing.
- I lived on a Kibbutiz in Israel between high school and college.
 

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Satoru Suzuki

Hometown/Birthplace: Sapporo (in the northern most island excluding tiny islands)/Fukuoka (in the southern most island excluding tiny islands), Japan

Educational Background: BA in Physics (1988) Wesleyan University; MS in Physics (1990) University of Massachusetts at Amherst; PH.D in Psychology (1995) Harvard University; Post Doc in Psychology (1995-1997) University of Arizona

Date came to NU: September, 1997

Classes taught/teaching: 201 Statistical methods in psychology; 324 Perception; 368 Consciousness; 397/399 Independent research; 450 Fundamentals of statistics; 424 Behavioral and neural bases of vision

Current research pursuits: Understanding visual perception, visual attention, influences of auditory and tactile senses, emotions, thoughts, and language on vision, and dynamic mental states, using behavioral and EEG experiments and computational modeling.

Do you need any help in your lab? Anyone who is passionate about sicentifically understanding the mind, especially visual perceptioin, attention, and consciousness

Describe the best work environment for you: Mountain cabin

Why are you here at Northwestern? They offered me a great job

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? I'd be writing movie scores, climbing mountains, or running experiments in my basement to figure out the secret of the universe.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? Love to teach students who enjoy learning. Loathe to teach students who show up to sleep (even if I might justify why I did it when I was in college).

Out of all the well-known people in the history of Psychology, who was the most influential for you and why? I studied Physics for BA and Masters, and then specialized in visual perception for Ph.D. So, I wasn't particularly influenced by any psychologist.

Three things that not many people know about you:
- I was almost a music major in college (until I got a C in a medieval musicology class).
- My physics Masters thesis was about inducing plasmon oscillations in thin ethanol films (I had access to pure alcohol and 24k gold as they were consumed [actually used and discarded] by my experiments).
- Neither my going to Wesleyan, UMASS Amherst, nor to Harvard was premeditated.

Two things every student needs to know about you:
-I like almost any food except chewy, fat, vinegar and cake (especially with frosting) -I would like to solve the mind-body problem

 

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Tony Tang

Hometown/Birthplace: Guiyang, China

Educational Background: Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Date came to NU: 9/2000

Classes taught/teaching: Intro to Clinical Psychology; Freshman Seminar on Evolutionary Psychology; Positive Psychology; Psychotherapy (for grad students only)

Current research pursuits: Mechanisms of psychotherapy, how do therapy produces change in patients; Evolutionary Psychology; Analyzing psychological theories on emotion and cognition with modern mathematical tools.

Do you need any help in your lab? Yes. Always looking for people who combine strong interests in emotion and cognition with good skills in mathematics or computer programming. We need help with transcribing and analyzing therapy sessions from time to time too.

Describe the best work environment for you: NU is close to ideal, especially if it is 20 degrees warmer in the winter.

Why are you here? Well, I love the lakefront campus, and the faculty members here are very interesting and supportive.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? Too many possibilities to list here.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I like students who actually think seriously about the material, instead of just taking notes so that they can cram for the finals.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... great.  

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David Uttal

Hometown/Birthplace: Lynchburg, Virginia

Educational Background: B.S., William and Mary, Ph.D., University of Michigan, Post-doc, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Date came to NU: August 1, 1993

Classes taught/teaching: Intro, Developmental, Freshman Seminars, Cognitive Development, Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Seminars in Spatial Cognition

Current research pursuits: I'm studying two things: The development of spatial cognition, and the development of symbolic representation.

Do you need any help in your lab? Sometimes -- depends on the quarter.

Describe the best work environment for you: Well, I would like to say a calm, organized place, but sometimes I do better under stress.

Why are you here? Because of great students and great colleagues.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? I would probably join my wife as an attorney

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love to teach students who want to learn (which is almost all Northwestern students). I don't like to teach students who don't want to be here. Finish this sentence: Freud was… wrong but he started the field. Five things every student needs to know about you: I don't know if there are five. Come prepared and you can learn a lot. It sometimes takes time to learn how to study (in any class, not just mine)--stick with it.

Three things that not many people know about you:
- I am a fan of Sponge Bog/Square Pants
- I love Gilmore Girls
- I like to ride my bicycle but not in the winter.
 

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Sandra Waxman

Hometown/Birthplace: Hartford, Connecticut

Educational Background: Ph.D.

Date came to NU: 1992

Classes taught/teaching: developmental, cognitive development, practicum in child development, etc.

Current research pursuits: Early language and cognitive development in infants and toddlers...

Do you need any help in your lab? Sure -- always!

Describe the best work environment for you: ??

Why are you here? I love what I do.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? I'll tell you later.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? Love interested and interesting. Loathe bored.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... quite a theoretician.

Five things every student needs to know about you:
- I work hard and expect everyone in my lab to do the same
- You have to be reliable
- I am not especially relaxed....
- I love coffee
- Putting in the extra little bit of effort goes a very, very long way
 

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Richard Zinbarg

Hometown/Birthplace: New York, NY

Educational Background: BA: University of Pennsylvania; PhD: Northwestern

Date came to NU: Fall 1998

Classes taught/teaching: Statistics (201), Advanced Statistics (351), Personality (215), Clinical Research Methods (434), Anxiety Assessment and Treatment Practicum (413)

Current research pursuits: Risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders and depression; developing better treatments for anxiety disorders with a particular focus on generalized anxiety disorder and the impact of couple functioning on treatment response; statistics for estimating the reliability of composite scales.

Do you need any help in your lab? Almost always.

Describe the best work environment for you: One filled with brilliant and critical students and colleagues to help identify my bad ideas and inspire good ones.

Why are you here? Well, I have excellent colleagues and students here. However, that was true at the University of Oregon as well (where I was an assistant professor for six years). The main reason for coming here from Oregon was that my wife is from Chicago and her three brothers and sisters (and their kids) are all still living in the area.

If you weren't a psychology professor, what and where would you be? A ski instructor, preferably in Utah.

What type of student do you love to teach? Loathe to teach? I love to teach students who are eager to take an active role in their learning. I loathe to teach students who want to be "spoon-fed" knowledge.

Finish this sentence: Freud was... certainly the most influential thinker the field of clinical psychology/psychiatry has ever known and will ever know (though I can imagine that others - such as Tim Beck - one of the founders of cognitive therapy - will come to be known as being as influential as Freud within the field, I can't imagine that anyone else will ever has as much influence outside of the discipline including english and history).

Two things every student needs to know about you:
-I do not believe in being bound by convention if I believe there is a more effective way to accomplish some educational goal (witness my 201 class in which I do very little lecturing).
-I have 2 young children who I am devoted to thus my hours are a bit different than those of my faculty in the department who either don't have kids or whose kids are grown (I like to get in to the office early and leave campus by about 5:30 most days).

Three things that not many people know about you:
- in a past life, I was a "Deadhead" (I attended roughly 30 concerts, have every studio and live album the band ever recorded plus many bootleg recordings, the jazz band who played at my wedding played a couple of Grateful Dead/Jerry Garcia tunes at my request including "Ripple" and "They love each other", and my dog - Sugaree - is named after a Grateful Dead song)
- I started college as a biomedical engineering major and was placed on academic probation as I had a C, D, F and a withdrawal the first semester of my sophomore year (I believe I had a 4.0 every semester thereafter coinciding with switching my major to psychology, finding some discipline in my life and staying sober most of the time)
- I used to be a pretty good point guard and I was, and still am, a pretty good skier (though moguls take a bit more out of my knees than they used to)
- I bought my first Harry Potter book ostensibly for my eldest child and started to read it supposedly just to check it out to see if it would be suitable to read to her someday and became totally addicted such that I have now read them all (some in just two or three largely sleepless days) and we have still not yet reached the age when we have begun to read any to her!
- two of my favorite novels of all time are both by Herman Hesse: Siddharta and Steppenwolf (and, at least according to my interpretation, they both contain psychological insights that I find very useful in my own life and in my work with my psychotherapy patients)
 

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